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Global Running Day 2021

Join thousands of fellow runners across the globe and get involved with Global Running Day 2021 on the 2nd of June. You can sign up with Strava (here) and between the 1st and 6th June help get more people running.

This year as it’s virtual you can run anywhere and look to complete the one mile distance and serves as a gentle way into running.

What Is Global Running Day 2021?

New York Road Runners (NYRR): “Global Running Day 2021 is a worldwide celebration of running that encourages everyone to get moving. This day plays an important role, reminding us of the positives that running can offer and the power of unification. It’s mission seems more important than ever right now, as people everywhere attempt to stay active and healthy. During these challenging times, many people are turning to running as a solution to help release anxiety, gain perspective, cope with cabin fever, and keep up wellbeing.

Our physical Global Running Day events may be paused, but it’s important that we all keep active in a safe and responsible way. This year, Global Running Day 2021 will be digitally uniting people across the world in a global effort to encourage physical wellness and strengthen community.”

If you are trying out running for the first time during this week, good for you! It’s those first steps to a new way of life and a great way to get into shape. As they say, the hardest step in running is the first one out of the door. You can sign up here.

Here are a few helpful pointers from some experienced runners to motivate you and encourage you to get started, highlighting things they wish they knew when they first started running and from others, their favourite running metric.

Jo Pavey, Five-time Olympian and Saucony UK Ambassador

“At the start of my senior career I wish I’d realised the importance of focussing on the most important components of training – for example intervals. Trying to cram everything into a schedule particularly when you’re not yet conditioned to cope with it can lead to injury. It also affects the quality of the important workouts and leads to less progress. After a promising start to my senior career, I tried to improve further too quickly adding in too much strength and conditioning type work and higher mileage too soon. This resulted in a very long time off injured. A schedule should always relate to your current level of fitness and conditioning. Start with building up the important workouts first, then slowly introduce other components over time. Always listen to your body and modify your schedule when necessary, too.”

Anna Kosciuk, Sport Scientist at NURVV

“That running is not just about putting miles in. That in order to become a good runner and achieve satisfactory performance results, runners have to work hard on every aspect of their technique independently of their running sessions. This includes incorporating strength training, optimising recovery and maintaining good flexibility levels.

If I knew all that at the beginning of my running journey, it would have been easier for me to beat my PBs and see myself succeed quicker in becoming a faster and smarter runner!” 

My favourite running metric is pronation! This shouldn’t really surprise anyone, but I do genuinely find it fascinating how terrain, type of running course and footwear type can all affect foot motion during running.

There is, however, still a lot to discover in this area mainly because everyone is so different and the relationship between pronation, performance and injury is still unclear.”  

Global Running Day 2021

Allie Kieffer, NURVV Run Ambassador and 5th Place Finisher at New York Marathon – 2:28:12 PB

One thing I wish I knew when I started running was that I’d want to run forever, so to take care of my body to enjoy the adventure!

My favorite running metric is foot strike- it’s my weakest score and biggest category for improvement. I especially like to see the asymmetry from left to right foot because I’ve been working diligently on the strength routine to improve it!

James Williams, leading Ultra-runner and Saucony UK ambassador

“I wish I knew that “the race doesn’t really start until you’re about 75% in”. You don’t win any prizes for being the fastest person in the first part of the race, but those last parts are the most crucial. This has become more important as I’ve stepped up in distances from 5k’s all the way to 100-mile races and multi-day races too. If you don’t control yourself in that first part, you’re going to have a very, very long day!”

Katrina Hart – Commonwealth Games gold medallist and Paralympic bronze medallist from London 2012 and Saucony UK Ambassador

“Do all the little things well. It’s the small things that make a real difference. When I started running I thought all the big things mattered and over time I’ve realised it’s all the little things that piece the puzzle together. I enjoy having variety in training that keeps it fun and engaging and have really started to understand the importance of doing the little things well such as rest, recovery and hydration that’ll make all the difference.”

James Thie, Saucony UK ambassador, leading UK coach and world master champion

“For me it’s that running is all about the long game, as in you don’t need to be the best you can be today or even tomorrow, but have lots of time to improve and enjoy the journey!’’

Tom Marshall, Commonwealth Games 1500m runner, sub-four minute miler and Saucony UK ambassador

“Consistency is key. Absolutely no need to run every workout out hard, and if your body is in need of a day off, take it. Better off being consistent than overdoing it and ending up ill or injured.”

We featured the event last year here.